Prometheus Forum
We are the Gods now
Did anyone get the 'distance from earth' at the beginning?
  • MariaMaria  (1 like this)
    Colonist
    I am trying to figure out how many light years this system was from earth, and they indicated it, but I didn't get the exact number.  I think it was supposed to be an intergalactic mission, but the number alluded to a system within our own Milky Way.  Just curious.  The distance was in kilomieters and it was something x 10^14 if I remember correctly.  Thanks!
    ~In space, no one can hear you scream, unless space is CGI~
  • GarcaldoGarcaldo  
    Colonist
    No idea. Does it really matter?
  • KirillKirill  (1 like this)
    Colonist
    3,47x10^14 miles
  • martin7martin7  
    Colonist
    The real Zeta Reticuli is "about 39 light-years (12 parsecs) from the Earth." 
  • KirillKirill  
    Colonist

    martin7 said:

    The real Zeta Reticuli is "about 39 light-years (12 parsecs) from the Earth." 



    which is about 3,7x10^14 KM
    :)
    I am 100% sure, that the idea of star map invitation came came from Pleiades stars
  • CrosbieCrosbie  
    Colonist
    It was given in KM. couldn't remember the number but I noticed it was in KM when rewatching today.
  • GahlaktusGahlaktus  
    Colonist
    Kirill is right : roughly 39.5 light years-- something on the order of 240 trillion miles, approximately. Not your typical neighborhood walk.
  • BonusituationBonusituation  (1 like this)
    Like_A_Boss
    The odd thing is Vickers makes some comment about being "half a billion miles" from other humans or something like that.

    This was a headscratcher for me.  500 million miles isn't that far in the scheme of cosmic distances.  That's well within the radius of our own solar system.  Earth is 93 million miles from the sun.  Jupiter to the sun is about 480 million miles.
    We ain't outta here in ten minutes, we won't need no rocket to fly through space.
  • tifosi77tifosi77  (3 like this)
    Colonist
    I think it was just an off-hand remark.  Remember, she's a corporate executive, not a space traveler.
    Perfect organism.
  • XenoWorfXenoWorf  (4 like this)
    Colonist
    The "science" in the movie was essentially made up - non-existent for all intents and purposes.  The Engineers might as well have been evil Warlock and the black goo their magic potions of doom for all the "science" in this  faux-science fiction movie :(

    How are you supposed to get a star position from 5 dots on a wall.  (hint: you can't!).  There  a about two hundred billion stars in the galaxy - four hundred billion if you count the stars in the halo which means that you can pretty much take any given five dots and match it up to five stars somewhere in the galaxy probably a great many groups of five stars. 

    If this was actually a science fiction movie you would make the five dits pulsars with some sort of glyph representing some distance from them like we did on the Voyager mission.  But nooo ....  five dots on a wall...black goo that ultimately makes Alien Xenomorphs and plot-device androids that spike your champagne with alien goo because they're apparently in a mood or something.  Grrrr......
  • MariaMaria  (1 like this)
    Colonist
    Gahlaktus said:

    Kirill is right : roughly 39.5 light years-- something on the order of 240 trillion miles, approximately. Not your typical neighborhood walk.



    That is actually a very close neighbor.  If it was intergalactic, we're talking about millions of light years.   

    ~In space, no one can hear you scream, unless space is CGI~
  • MariaMaria  
    Colonist
    XenoWorf said:

    The "science" in the movie was essentially made up - non-existent for all intents and purposes.  The Engineers might as well have been evil Warlock and the black goo their magic potions of doom for all the "science" in this  faux-science fiction movie :(

    How are you supposed to get a star position from 5 dots on a wall.  (hint: you can't!).  There  a about two hundred billion stars in the galaxy - four hundred billion if you count the stars in the halo which means that you can pretty much take any given five dots and match it up to five stars somewhere in the galaxy probably a great many groups of five stars. 

    If this was actually a science fiction movie you would make the five dits pulsars with some sort of glyph representing some distance from them like we did on the Voyager mission.  But nooo ....  five dots on a wall...black goo that ultimately makes Alien Xenomorphs and plot-device androids that spike your champagne with alien goo because they're apparently in a mood or something.  Grrrr......



    Yes, I'm sure if you tossed a hand full of sand on a flat smooth surface, you could still statistically get a particular grouping.  The science wasn't that great in this film, and they're assuming this grouping is how it looks from Earth, where that same grouping would look totally different from another location in our 3D universe.  
    ~In space, no one can hear you scream, unless space is CGI~
  • KirillKirill  (1 like this)
    Colonist

    The odd thing is Vickers makes some comment about being "half a billion miles" from other humans or something like that.



    I guess he mentioned colonies, saying "500 mln miles..." Not the Earth.

    It hardly depends on which system he mentioned, saying Billion. There are two kinds of billions :) 10^9 and 10^12.


  • KaiidaerusKaiidaerus  (2 like this)
    Colonist
    XenoWorf said:

    The "science" in the movie was essentially made up - non-existent for all intents and purposes.  The Engineers might as well have been evil Warlock and the black goo their magic potions of doom for all the "science" in this  faux-science fiction movie :(



    "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
    --Arthur C. Clarke
  • BonusituationBonusituation  (4 like this)
    Like_A_Boss
    XenoWorf said:

    The "science" in the movie was essentially made up - non-existent for all intents and purposes.  The Engineers might as well have been evil Warlock and the black goo their magic potions of doom for all the "science" in this  faux-science fiction movie :(







    “It's not a science class – it's a movie”
    --Ridley Scott

    That being said, there's a reason it's called science fiction.  Give me a list of your favorite science fiction movies and I can wreck the shit out of the science in them.
    We ain't outta here in ten minutes, we won't need no rocket to fly through space.
  • kevin76kevin76  
    Colonist

    Well it's like when your mom said "I told you a thousand times to clean your room" my moom used millions. The point is she didn't same when that guy holds his hands a part and says the fish was this big.

    There also the other case "it only a minor dent " refering to the huge caved in side panel on the car.

     

    It's called over exaration and under exaration people don't read to much into it.

     

  • XenoWorfXenoWorf  (2 like this)
    Colonist
    “It's not a science class – it's a movie”

    Translation: Science is hard. Scamming ten bucks from millions of gullible movie goers by way of advertising hype is easy.

    There are a great many successful science fiction movies and books that do not assume that the reader is stupid.
  • VisionistVisionist  (1 like this)
    Panton_Vel_Nusquam

    Give me a list of your favorite science fiction movies and I can wreck the shit out of the science in them.






    The Andromeda Strain.

    Knock yourself out :P



























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    I'm the man who gets to fly around in a helicopter with a gun.
    You call me MUFWIG.
    Mother Fucker What's In Charge.
  • deadinspacedeadinspace  
    Colonist
    XenoWorf said:

    “It's not a science class – it's a movie”

    Translation: Science is hard. Scamming ten bucks from millions of gullible movie goers by way of advertising hype is easy.

    There are a great many successful science fiction movies and books that do not assume that the reader is stupid.




    Pretty much. For all the production people they hired, you'd think someone might have called an astrophysicist like Brian Cox (who worked with Danny Boyle on Sunshine) to do some consulting work.

    In retrospect, it makes me laugh when I think about what that dunderheaded Fox CEO Tom Rothman said when he looked into an interviewers eyes, and with a straight face said: "We believe that you can make a blockbuster by respecting the audience."

     

  • MariaMaria  
    Colonist
    I don't expect total scientific accuracy in a sci-fi film, but for simple things, like noise in the vacuum of space, it really bugs me.   Honestly, 'in space, no one can hear you scream' doesn't apply to a lot of science films because you can hear the screams, laser weapons, rocket engines, and the whole nine yards.  I think you could even hear the ion engines fire up in space near the beginning of Prometheus.  
    ~In space, no one can hear you scream, unless space is CGI~
  • SkorgeSkorge  (2 like this)
    Colonist
    Visionist said:

    The Andromeda Strain.






    I watched this movie about a year ago. There's some pretty made up science fiction going on in this movie too and it's not even in space! How in the hell can a computer predict the probability rates accurately like that...what's worse, who even cares about the probability rates, I mean it obviously needed to be contained, so regardless of that it didn't matter, it was for just filler...also in that movie the scientists were doing some very weird things in it that I had ZERO clue what they were doing! Also when computers overload they dont make weird random loud noises with pretty designs that end with a screen saying 601,lol...and the part the dude was climbing up that later to avoid those lazers was ridiculous...they must have purchased that lazer gun at the Dollar Store it was so weak it couldnt damage anything or come close to hitting the dude...

    You can point out things in all science fiction movies....
  • MariaMaria  (1 like this)
    Colonist
    I prefer science-fact films like Apollo 13, but even then, I'm sure some things were made up in the interest of time, and to make it understandable for the audience.


    ~In space, no one can hear you scream, unless space is CGI~
  • XenoWorf said:

    “It's not a science class – it's a movie”

    Translation: Science is hard. Scamming ten bucks from millions of gullible movie goers by way of advertising hype is easy.

    There are a great many successful science fiction movies and books that do not assume that the reader is stupid.




    Pretty much. For all the production people they hired, you'd think someone might have called an astrophysicist like Brian Cox (who worked with Danny Boyle on Sunshine) to do some consulting work.



    Brian Cox should never work again because Sunshine was one of the dumbest movies ever made.  There's nothing remotely realistic about it.
  • MariaMaria  
    Colonist

    XenoWorf said:

    “It's not a science class – it's a movie”

    Translation: Science is hard. Scamming ten bucks from millions of gullible movie goers by way of advertising hype is easy.

    There are a great many successful science fiction movies and books that do not assume that the reader is stupid.




    Pretty much. For all the production people they hired, you'd think someone might have called an astrophysicist like Brian Cox (who worked with Danny Boyle on Sunshine) to do some consulting work.



    Brian Cox should never work again because Sunshine was one of the dumbest movies ever made.  There's nothing remotely realistic about it.


    Might not be his fault though.  Just because you hire a science adviser doesn't mean you have to adhere to high scientific standards.  It does sound like good advertising hype though, and I remember he did help to advertise the film.  The main character (the physicist guy) was also based on Bryan Cox.
    ~In space, no one can hear you scream, unless space is CGI~
  • padruigpadruig  
    Colonist

    At 40 light years out your looking at maybe 300+ star systems and where our galaxy is estimated at 100,000 light years across, so your friends the "goo-grays" are pretty much just around the corner.


    Thus human beings are now carrying out a large scale geophysical experiment of a kind that could not have happened in the past nor be reproduced in the future. Within a few centuries we are returning to the atmosphere and oceans the concentrated organic carbon stored in sedimentary rocks over hundreds of millions of years.
  • XenoWorf said:

    “It's not a science class – it's a movie”

    Translation: Science is hard. Scamming ten bucks from millions of gullible movie goers by way of advertising hype is easy.

    There are a great many successful science fiction movies and books that do not assume that the reader is stupid.




    Pretty much. For all the production people they hired, you'd think someone might have called an astrophysicist like Brian Cox (who worked with Danny Boyle on Sunshine) to do some consulting work.



    Brian Cox should never work again because Sunshine was one of the dumbest movies ever made.  There's nothing remotely realistic about it.


    Might not be his fault though.  Just because you hire a science adviser doesn't mean you have to adhere to high scientific standards.  It does sound like good advertising hype though, and I remember he did help to advertise the film.  The main character (the physicist guy) was also based on Bryan Cox.


    Love it when they left the decision (whether to deviate course to the Icarus I) up to him and he asked the computer.

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