Prometheus Forum
We are the Gods now
Prometheus Footage Screening + Q&A in London
  • nope just some guy who probably walked in off the street. :)
    Jonesy you little shit..you're staying right here
  • Kuato_LivesKuato_Lives  (4 like this)
    Colonist
    Sounds like everyone who saw it had a good time. Although I have to question what it was like just to see the first 30 minutes and no more, In all honesty I think that would drive me nuts, it's like sticking on a really good DVD watching it for half an hour and then turning it off except you won't be able to re-continue it well at least not for another 2 months.
  • terrapinbearterrapinbear  
    Colonist
    =\/\/= The Prometheus Has Landed! =\/\/=
  • ummesterummester  
    AssFlower

    So is it the first 15 mins of the film - did they see title credits - or is it just 15 mins from the first act somewhere?

    Want to know about the beginning of time bit, if it shows that waterfall and what is going on.

    Suck fuddlety!
  • bunnypfbunnypf  
    Colonist
    ummester said:

    So is it the first 15 mins of the film - did they see title credits - or is it just 15 mins from the first act somewhere?

    Want to know about the beginning of time bit, if it shows that waterfall and what is going on.




    Read my link above ^^^^ - seems like a ten minute chunk from the first half hour.
    "Once upon a time I was a hell of an Engineer."
  • JonesycatpantsJonesycatpants  (1 like this)
    Catpower
    This thing was clearly some kind of life form, probably alien in origin,
    though it’s believed that mutated humans will feature in the story too.
    It looked a bit like a flower crossed with a sphincter and it had sharp
    claws or teeth or other protrusions of that kind. And it seemed to be
    reaching up and coming towards the screen. There was undoubtedly a touch
    of “Facehugger plus” about this thing.


    that describes that gif that looked like a facehugger leaping from an egg from the early leaked tralier

    Jonesy you little shit..you're staying right here
  • ummesterummester  
    AssFlower

    sorry bunny, just read it, all clear now

    yes, jonesy, that was the most interesting bit I read to - definately something other than SJs on LV226

    Suck fuddlety!
  • drxs0drxs0  
    Colonist
    "This thing was clearly some kind of life form, probably alien in origin,
    though it’s believed that mutated humans will feature in the story too.
    It looked a bit like a flower crossed with a sphincter and it had sharp
    claws or teeth or other protrusions of that kind. And it seemed to be
    reaching up and coming towards the screen. There was undoubtedly a touch
    of “Facehugger plus” about this thing."

    Sounds to me like he is describing cuddles.

    And this part " As well as the now well-known “star chart” element in the image, with a
    taller figure (representative of the Space Jockey) pointing to the
    heavens, one of the cave drawings shows a big, deadly looking… something, attacking a group of smaller human figures." 

    I have seen that image the tall guy does not look like he is attacking.  Quite the opposite, more like the people are worshiping him.
    ~In Space No One Can Hear You Scream~
  • JonesycatpantsJonesycatpants  (1 like this)
    Catpower
    "Even before film was approved Ridley & 5 designers created a manual
    of the look of film's world right down to kitchen utensils"
    Jonesy you little shit..you're staying right here


  • yeah i read earlier that didn't tell me much.
    Jonesy you little shit..you're staying right here
  • JonesycatpantsJonesycatpants  (1 like this)
    Catpower

    So, we’ve just been lucky enough to see a chunk of Prometheus
    footage, followed by a Q&A hosted by Empire Magazine’s Chris Hewitt
    and featuring direct Ridley Scott and stars Noomi Rapace, Michael
    Fassbender and Charlize Theron, at press event held by 20th Century Fox
    in London’s Leicester Square.


    The footage lasted about 15-20 minutes, and consisted of mainly of
    completed scenes, both extensions of bits we’ve seen in the various
    trailers, and new stuff, before merging into what seems to be a slightly
    modified version of the International trailer footagethat we have all
    seen by now. Before the screening began, we were told that we were the
    first people outside Fox to see the footage.


    The following descriptions come from my hastily scribbled (in the
    dark) notes, and memory, so my apologies in advance if they seem a bit
    disjointed.


    The footage opens on the Isle of Skye in the year 2089(?) and is a
    longer version of the opening of the International trailer, with Shaw
    and Holloway on an archaeological dig and uncovering the
    pictogram/constellation we have seen already.


    Cut to the year 2093, and the Prometheus glides through space. David
    the android walks alone on the ship, which suddenly judders to a halt –
    it appears to have reached its destination.


    David goes to the bridge and fires up all the systems before going to
    wake the crew from stasis, only to find that Vickers (Theron) is
    already up and finishing what looks like a punishing exercise regime.
    Ever the hard-nosed business woman, her only question to David is ‘did
    anyone die?’


    After seeing the crew recuperating from their hypersleep, including
    some copious vomiting from Shaw, we cut to the Prometheus’s hanger. Here
    we see a hologram video message from Peter Welyand, recorded in 2091.
    If you are watching this now, he says, “I’ll be dead, may I rest in
    peace”. He uses his recording to introduce Shaw and Holloway and they
    then give their talk shown in the trailers, though extended here. To
    paraphrase – “The constellation shown in the pictograms was so far away
    that the there is no way the civilisations that appear to have made them
    could have known about it, but we do. We know it has a sun, and we know
    it has an Earth-like planet. And this is where we are now.”


    That planet is LV-223.


    Next we get some new shots of the Prometheus landing, and an
    extremely clear shot of the ‘mountain’ structure previously glimpsed.
    Now, while we have said that this reminds us of the work that Giger did
    for an abandoned adaptation of Dune (see below), in the shot here it’s
    unmistakeable. It’s missing the ‘arms’, but the ‘head’ and face are
    clearly visible in profile.



    Here’s where we cut back to more familiar ground, consisting mostly
    of the international trailer footage with maybe a few tweaks here and
    there, though nothing real note.


    I have to say it was all very impressive. The footage looked
    fantastic – Scott has hit a visual home run on this one, without a
    doubt. I’m not a fan of 3D at all, but I must say it works well, not
    drawing attention to itself, but definately pulling you into the movie.
    This could be the movie that changes my mind about – well utilised – 3D.
    The old age makeup on Guy Pearce is also very well done. It may have
    been helped by the hologram VFX, or it could even be CGI-enhanced, but
    it looked very natural and didn’t interfere with his performance. I’m
    also now more convinced that ever that, despite the character saying
    otherwise, he is very much alive and more or less well when the
    Prometheus lands on LV-223, and that the images below do in fact show
    Weyland. Did he get to LV-223 before the Prometheus, and the crew find
    him there?


    Guy Pearce?



    Next up was the Q&A. Empire’s Chris Hewitt took charge, as a few
    lucky audience members go to ask questions. We’ve been promised a full
    transcipt along with some clips of the session, so in the meantime
    here’s a few highlights I picked out, along with my thoughts.


    Scott commented on what brought him back to the Alien universe – The
    sequels had not explored the biggest question – who was was the Space
    Jockey, why did he have that cargo, and where was he headed with it? The
    Alien sequels were “all jolly good, in one for or other”.


    While the project started as an Alien prequel, the more he got
    involved in another story, the “less inclined I was” to connect it to
    Alien.


    Noomi Rapace calls he character conflicted. Shaw is a scientist with a
    faith in God – her search for the origins of man-kind doesn’t lead
    where she expects.


    Michael Fassbender didn’t rewatch Ian Holms or Lance Henkrikson’s
    performances, but instead looked to Blade Runner and Lawrence of Arabia
    amongst other for inspiration and clues for his performance. Scott said
    there is a lot of humour in David’s character – I did get a certain
    sense of deadpan wit Fassbender’s performance – and that we “are allowed
    to laugh”.


    Theron said that Vickers starts the film as detatched and cold – I
    guess that will change – and is neither a believer or scientist, but is
    there for a personal reason – does she know that Weyland is on LV-223?
    Is she related to him?


    Scott spent 4 and a half months working with production designer
    Arthur Max and his team before the film was even greenlit to get the
    designs locked down.


    Scott was then asked a quesiton about the rating of the original
    Alien, but his answer was a more general one. Starting with a
    half-joking “I want a certificate that’s best for the box office”, he
    made a valid arguement that it’s in everyone’s interest to make a film
    that is as accessible to as big an audience as possible. After all, he
    pointed out, if a studio doesn’t make its money back, there are no
    movies. Even if a rubbish film is a hit, overall it’s a good thing. I
    have to say, as much as I’d like to see a full-on R/18 rated Prometheus,
    I understand completely that studios are running a business – Scott
    himself said is a director and a business man. Given that movies like
    The Woman in Black and The Hunger Games are pushing boundries at the
    lower rating, I don’t think we should be too worried if Prometheus ends
    up a PG-113/12A – after all, there’s always the likely uncut video
    release.


    Scott promised that Rapace has a scene ‘equivalent’ to Alien’s chestburster, that no other actor was involved in.


    Finally, touching on his use of 3D, Scott seemed to dismiss those who
    say it adds too much complexity to shooting. As a strong visual
    director, Scott says, he found 3D “pretty straightforward”.


    Overall I came away very impressed. The look and feel of the footage
    we saw was excellent, while the director and stars seemed really
    enthusiastic about the film.


    So what did we learn? Nothing massively earth shattering, though many
    peoples’ suspicions that the movie does not take place on LV-426 appear
    confirmed. Perhaps Scott’s regular comments that the last few minutes
    of the film will tie to Alien will see a change of location. Perhaps the
    ‘derelict’ we see crashing is not the same one that appears to be
    taking off when we see the giant ‘hanger doors’ open under Shaw’s feet
    in the trailers, and it’s this second ship that the crew of the Nostromo
    find?


    As I said, we have been promised a full transcript of the chat, which
    will hopefully make a bit more sense, and we’ll get that online as soon
    as we have it!


    Prometheus is directed by Ridley Scott, from a screenplay by Damon
    Lindelof and Jon Spaihts. The film stars Noomi Rapace, Michael
    Fassbender, Charlize Theron, Guy Pearce, Idris Elba, Sean Harris, Rafe
    Spall, Logan Marshall-Green, Patrick Wilson and Kate Dickie, and is due
    for release on June 8th 2012 in the USA, and June 1st 2012 in the UK.

    http://www.prometheusmovienews.com/2012/04/prometheus-footage-screening-and-qa-report/

    Jonesy you little shit..you're staying right here
  • ViscalViscal  (1 like this)
    Brometheus
    So, we’ve just been lucky enough to see a chunk of Prometheus footage, followed by a Q&A hosted by Empire Magazine’s Chris Hewitt and featuring direct Ridley Scott and stars Noomi Rapace, Michael Fassbender and Charlize Theron, at press event held by 20th Century Fox in London’s Leicester Square.

    The footage lasted about 15-20 minutes, and consisted of mainly of completed scenes, both extensions of bits we’ve seen in the various trailers, and new stuff, before merging into what seems to be a slightly modified version of the International trailer footagethat we have all seen by now. Before the screening began, we were told that we were the first people outside Fox to see the footage.

    The following descriptions come from my hastily scribbled (in the dark) notes, and memory, so my apologies in advance if they seem a bit disjointed.

    The footage opens on the Isle of Skye in the year 2089(?) and is a longer version of the opening of the International trailer, with Shaw and Holloway on an archaeological dig and uncovering the pictogram/constellation we have seen already.

    Cut to the year 2093, and the Prometheus glides through space. David the android walks alone on the ship, which suddenly judders to a halt – it appears to have reached its destination.

    David goes to the bridge and fires up all the systems before going to wake the crew from stasis, only to find that Vickers (Theron) is already up and finishing what looks like a punishing exercise regime. Ever the hard-nosed business woman, her only question to David is ‘did anyone die?’

    After seeing the crew recuperating from their hypersleep, including some copious vomiting from Shaw, we cut to the Prometheus’s hanger. Here we see a hologram video message from Peter Welyand, recorded in 2091. If you are watching this now, he says, “I’ll be dead, may I rest in peace”. He uses his recording to introduce Shaw and Holloway and they then give their talk shown in the trailers, though extended here. To paraphrase – “The constellation shown in the pictograms was so far away that the there is no way the civilisations that appear to have made them could have known about it, but we do. We know it has a sun, and we know it has an Earth-like planet. And this is where we are now.”

    That planet is LV-223.

    Next we get some new shots of the Prometheus landing, and an extremely clear shot of the ‘mountain’ structure previously glimpsed. Now, while we have said that this reminds us of the work that Giger did for an abandoned adaptation of Dune (see below), in the shot here it’s unmistakeable. It’s missing the ‘arms’, but the ‘head’ and face are clearly visible in profile.


    Here’s where we cut back to more familiar ground, consisting mostly of the international trailer footage with maybe a few tweaks here and there, though nothing real note.

    I have to say it was all very impressive. The footage looked fantastic – Scott has hit a visual home run on this one, without a doubt. I’m not a fan of 3D at all, but I must say it works well, not drawing attention to itself, but definately pulling you into the movie. This could be the movie that changes my mind about – well utilised – 3D. The old age makeup on Guy Pearce is also very well done. It may have been helped by the hologram VFX, or it could even be CGI-enhanced, but it looked very natural and didn’t interfere with his performance. I’m also now more convinced that ever that, despite the character saying otherwise, he is very much alive and more or less well when the Prometheus lands on LV-223, and that the images below do in fact show Weyland. Did he get to LV-223 before the Prometheus, and the crew find him there?

    Next up was the Q&A. Empire’s Chris Hewitt took charge, as a few lucky audience members go to ask questions. We’ve been promised a full transcipt along with some clips of the session, so in the meantime here’s a few highlights I picked out, along with my thoughts.

    Scott commented on what brought him back to the Alien universe – The sequels had not explored the biggest question – who was was the Space Jockey, why did he have that cargo, and where was he headed with it? The Alien sequels were “all jolly good, in one for or other”.

    While the project started as an Alien prequel, the more he got involved in another story, the “less inclined I was” to connect it to Alien.

    Noomi Rapace calls he character conflicted. Shaw is a scientist with a faith in God – her search for the origins of man-kind doesn’t lead where she expects.

    Michael Fassbender didn’t rewatch Ian Holms or Lance Henkrikson’s performances, but instead looked to Blade Runner and Lawrence of Arabia amongst other for inspiration and clues for his performance. Scott said there is a lot of humour in David’s character – I did get a certain sense of deadpan wit Fassbender’s performance – and that we “are allowed to laugh”.

    Theron said that Vickers starts the film as detatched and cold – I guess that will change – and is neither a believer or scientist, but is there for a personal reason – does she know that Weyland is on LV-223? Is she related to him?

    Scott spent 4 and a half months working with production designer Arthur Max and his team before the film was even greenlit to get the designs locked down.

    Scott was then asked a quesiton about the rating of the original Alien, but his answer was a more general one. Starting with a half-joking “I want a certificate that’s best for the box office”, he made a valid arguement that it’s in everyone’s interest to make a film that is as accessible to as big an audience as possible. After all, he pointed out, if a studio doesn’t make its money back, there are no movies. Even if a rubbish film is a hit, overall it’s a good thing. I have to say, as much as I’d like to see a full-on R/18 rated Prometheus, I understand completely that studios are running a business – Scott himself said is a director and a business man. Given that movies like The Woman in Black and The Hunger Games are pushing boundries at the lower rating, I don’t think we should be too worried if Prometheus ends up a PG-113/12A – after all, there’s always the likely uncut video release.

    Scott promised that Rapace has a scene ‘equivalent’ to Alien’s chestburster, that no other actor was involved in.

    Finally, touching on his use of 3D, Scott seemed to dismiss those who say it adds too much complexity to shooting. As a strong visual director, Scott says, he found 3D “pretty straightforward”.

    Overall I came away very impressed. The look and feel of the footage we saw was excellent, while the director and stars seemed really enthusiastic about the film.

    So what did we learn? Nothing massively earth shattering, though many peoples’ suspicions that the movie does not take place on LV-426 appear confirmed. Perhaps Scott’s regular comments that the last few minutes of the film will tie to Alien will see a change of location. Perhaps the ‘derelict’ we see crashing is not the same one that appears to be taking off when we see the giant ‘hanger doors’ open under Shaw’s feet in the trailers, and it’s this second ship that the crew of the Nostromo find?

    As I said, we have been promised a full transcript of the chat, which will hopefully make a bit more sense, and we’ll get that online as soon as we have it!

    Prometheus is directed by Ridley Scott, from a screenplay by Damon Lindelof and Jon Spaihts. The film stars Noomi Rapace, Michael Fassbender, Charlize Theron, Guy Pearce, Idris Elba, Sean Harris, Rafe Spall, Logan Marshall-Green, Patrick Wilson and Kate Dickie, and is due for release on June 8th 2012 in the USA, and June 1st 2012 in the UK.


    http://www.prometheusmovienews.com/2012/04/prometheus-footage-screening-and-qa-report
    I wanna go home and party.
  • hahaah
    Jonesy you little shit..you're staying right here
  • drxs0drxs0  (3 like this)
    Colonist
    Shaw chestburster equivalent would probably be cuddles birth.
    ~In Space No One Can Hear You Scream~
  • VodiVodi  (3 like this)
    Predator
    And I'll reiterate once again for those who haven't seen this:

    "Note the name of the destination planet: it’s LV -226, possibly 223. Not LV-426, as featured in Alien and Aliens."

    That's one of the most decisive bits of information we've had recently and clears a few things up.
    Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.
  • VodiVodi  (1 like this)
    Predator
    Vickers asks, and with apparent dispassion, if any of the other passengers died during their two and a half year journey. 
    Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.
  • drxs0drxs0  (2 like this)
    Colonist
    Vodi said:

    And I'll reiterate once again for those who haven't seen this:

    "Note the name of the destination planet: it’s LV -226, possibly 223. Not LV-426, as featured in Alien and Aliens."


    That's one of the most decisive bits of information we've had recently and clears a few things up.


    And it proves this is not the same derelict.  I love feeling like we were right.  Makes me wonder what else we were right about.

    And Vickers comment, I am not sure how to take that. 
    ~In Space No One Can Hear You Scream~
  • ive got a good hunch, but it'll have to wait :)
    Jonesy you little shit..you're staying right here
  • VodiVodi  (3 like this)
    Predator
    "Noomi Rapace calls he character conflicted. Shaw is a scientist with a
    faith in God – her search for the origins of man-kind doesn’t lead 
    where she expects."

    We got that spot on then!

    Nice
    Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.
  • ViscalViscal  (1 like this)
    Brometheus
    TotalFilm's take on it!

    This morning saw the world's first screening of 3D footage from Prometheus at the Vue cinema in London's Leicester Square. We at Total Film were lucky enough to get a look at it, as well as attending a Q & A with both director and cast, and if possible, we're even more excited than we were before…

    We were treated to approximately 13 minutes of footage comprised of a series of scenes setting up the film's premise. Naturally, if you don't want to know anything before going in, you should probably stop reading now.

    First up was a sequence set on Scotland's Isle of Skye, in which research scientists Noomi Rapace and Logan Marshall-Green discover some peculiar markings on the wall of an old cave. Surmising that the etchings make reference to a race of extra-terrestrial beings, Rapace make the fateful proclamation that, "I think they want us to come and find them." Hmmm…

    The next scene was set upon the good ship Prometheus in the year 2093, with Michael Fassbender's placid android, David, attending to a pushup-performing Charlize Theron. "Were there any casualties?" she asks him casually, as she completes her workout. David confirms that there were not..



    She's referring to the awakening of the ship's research crew from their stasis chambers, having spent a whopping two and a half years in there before being roused. Straight off the bat it seems as though Theron's character, a suit from the Weyland Corporation, is a very cold fish indeed. Intriguingly, Theron revealed after the screening that her character is initially detached from the mission, but has actually got a very personal reason for being there. Curioser and curioser...

    We're briefly introduced to various crew members (including Idris Elba's scene-stealing badass, the pilot, Janek) before a hologram of Peter Weyland introduces the lead scientists and congratulates them on the mission ahead. As suggested by his TED talk, it's to be one of discovery. He also makes reference to David the android, describing him as "a son" before referring to his absence of a soul. David looks a bit hurt.

    It's then the turn of Marshall-Green and Rapace to explain the mission ahead, referring to their cave-based findings and revealing their discovery of a planet with its own moon, capable of sustaining life. That's where the crew are heading. Sean Harris makes a snide comment scoffing about the veracity of cave paintings, leading us to believe his card may well be marked…


    The final sequence showed us Prometheus coming in to land on the aforementioned planet, with Elba revelling in centre stage, firing off one-liners and generally chewing the scenery to great effect. It was probably the most visually arresting sequence in a film that promises to be extremely easy on the eye.

    The stage duly set, we were then shown a brief sizzle reel, re-capping some of the footage from the trailer, and generally showing all hell breaking loose. There was a very brief glimpse of something alien-like (although not particularly similar to a Xenomorph), the revelation that that giant head "is moving", and a deliciously icky moment involving one crew-member's eye…

    All in all, we were fairly blown away by proceedings. Although the bulk of the film's action was kept firmly under wraps, there was enough to suggest this will be quite the spectacle. Pleasingly, the 3D (filmed on the super-crisp RED camera) is of the layered, innocuous variety, never appearing distracting but adding real depth to some breathtakingly beautiful space-vistas. Indeed, we could have sat staring at the view from the ship's bridge all morning, had we been given the chance...

    In a brief Q & A after the screening, Ridley Scott revealed a few more tidbits about the project, explaining how Alien's Space Jockey scene was the whole jumping-off point for the film. Who was that figure, why was he there, why was he bearing that specific cargo and where was he heading? He and his kind might have wanted to be found, but not for the benevolent reasons believed by Rapace's character…

    As for the connection between the two films, Scott explained that the link is "barely in its DNA", reasserting that the film is a standalone piece. However, he did admit that the connection becomes more apparent in the films final seven minutes...

    Scott also dropped one final, mouthwatering teaser, promising that there will be a scene in Prometheus that serves as a counterpart to Alien's chestbuster moment. It involves Noomi Rapace, but that's all we know. Some things are best kept as a surprise…

    Prometheus opens in the UK on 1 June 2012. It just became our most-anticipated film of the year.

    http://www.totalfilm.com/news/prometheus-footage-reveal-report
    I wanna go home and party.
  • Kuato_LivesKuato_Lives  (1 like this)
    Colonist
    "LV-226, possibly 223" ???? Is this just a guess then? Since the planet can't be named without controversy?
  • yeah its interesting, at first people were reporting it as 223
    Jonesy you little shit..you're staying right here
  • drxs0drxs0  
    Colonist
    They may not have heard the name clearly.  Or read it.  From what I read stuff was on cards or slides.  Weird.
    ~In Space No One Can Hear You Scream~
  • roguedesignerroguedesigner  (1 like this)
    Colonist
    drxs0 said:

    Vodi said:

    And it proves this is not the same derelict.  I love feeling like we were right.



    I'm considering taking the rest of the day off to savour the warm feeling.

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